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Southside - Megastore
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2540 S Wabash
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Sat 10-5, Sun 12-5

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773-282-0202

3255 N. Milwaukee
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3712 N. Halsted
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219 W. Erie
M-F 11-7
Sat 10-5, Sun 12-5

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Use Quick Releases Correctly

Know Your Quick Release

The quick release exposed: a) lever; b) rod (also called a "skewer;" note the threaded end);
c) cap; and d) springs (these rest against the axle ends).

Incorrect quick-release use is dangerous because these mechanisms hold the wheels in place. The most common mistake is simply turning the lever like a nut until the wheel seems tight. Used this way the lever and wheel can loosen as you ride leading to catastrophe. Follow our directions and view the pictures and animation below to learn how to properly use a quick release. Please contact us if you’re still unsure how to use this crucial piece of equipment after reading this tutorial.

Inspecting Your Quick Release

Read the lever to tell if it's safe. If it reads "open," the wheel can come off!!

There are two ways to tell if the lever is open: most levers are marked "open" (photo) and "closed" so look for these markings. Also, levers are usually curved. When the bend protrudes outward like a bump, the lever is closed. When the bend is cupped, the lever is open. Closing and opening the lever requires flipping it 180 degrees, not spinning it.

Even if the lever reads "closed" and looks right, it's a good idea to test how tight it is by trying to open it by pulling on it. If it resists, it's tight and safe. If it opens with only a little effort, it's not tight enough. Follow our directions to tighten it.

Adjusting And Closing Your Quick Release

With the wheel centered in the fork (or frame), adjust the quick release by opening it, holding both ends and turning one clockwise until, when you close the lever, you feel some resistance. At this point, try to close the lever. The adjustment is correct when you can fully close the lever (animation) but with some effort (the lever should leave its impression in the palm of your hand). If you can only close the lever part way, open it, unscrew the adjustment slightly and try again.

Removing And Installing Your Wheel

Most forks have wheel-retention tabs on them, which are small protrusions that keep a loose wheel from falling out of the dropouts. The quick release must be open and adjusted by unscrewing to clear these tabs when you remove and install the wheel.

To do this, hold both ends of the quick release and turn one counterclockwise to unscrew it (photo) until there's enough clearance for the wheel to drop out of or fit into the fork (note that this adjustment is unnecessary on most rear wheels because retention tabs aren't used).

Tips

  • The quick-release levers should be on the left side of the bike.
  • Quick releases must be fully closed to ensure safety.
  • If you close the lever in such a way that it aligns with the fork (see animation) and stays, you'll have something to grip while squeezing the lever. It'll also keep the lever tucked away where it can't snag anything, which might happen leaning your bike next to another in a bike rack, for example.
  • If you ever unscrew the quick release until it comes apart, don't panic! Just try not to lose the little springs. They're not crucial and the quick release will work without them. They're only there to provide spring pressure to maintain some clearance between the ends of the quick release and the axle locknuts to make it easier to slide the wheel into the frame. To reinstall the springs, make sure that the narrow ends point inward (see top photo).

  • Maintenance

  • About once a month, lube your quick-release levers because dry levers won't work well and can feel tight when they're not.
  • Aluminum quick-release levers usually press against bushings as you close the lever. Lightly lube where the lever contacts the bushing (photo), to keep the quick release operating properly.
  • Steel levers usually pivot inside the cap. Apply lube to trickle inside the lever's pivot point.
  • If there's a nut or screw holding the lever (look beneath the cap), snug it with a wrench or screwdriver to make sure it's tight.

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